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Monday, December 11, 2017

Peter Senge

“Don’t push growth; remove the factors limiting growth.”

– Peter Senge; The Fifth Discipline, 1990

Piero Formica

“What’s the lesson for entrepreneurs and innovators today? The stronger the assumption that the future will function as today does, the greater the gravitational force of the status quo. Organizations set in their ways slow down and never strive for new horizons. They are doomed to wither.

If you don’t want to be caught by surprise, you have to recognize that the future will be different from the past. The future is unfathomable, ambiguous, and open to every option. One major move by a competitor, or one new technology, is sometimes all it takes to end an empire. If your current business is like a carefully tended garden, with neat beds and high walls, that’s not enough. The next opportunity (or threat) may lie outside those walls, at the messy intersection of sectors and markets.

Entrepreneurs and innovators resist “success as usual” syndrome, exploring emerging technologies and new business models. They try to keep the big picture in mind and are wary of being too efficient and too optimized. This perspective helps them promote unconventional ways of thinking, solving problems, and challenging the status quo. They know the goal is not to chase a fixed horizon but to understand when and how the horizon moves as they approach it.”

– Piero Formica; Why Innovators Should Study the Rise and Fall of the Venetian Empire, January 2017

Simon Sinek

“There are only two ways to influence human behavior: you can manipulate it or you can inspire it.”

– Simon Sinek; Start with Why, 2009

Edward de Bono

“A discussion should be a genuine attempt to explore a subject rather than a battle between competing egos.”

– Edward de Bono; How to Have A Beautiful Mind

Edward de Bono

“An explorer is sent off to a newly discovered island. On his return, he makes a report. He comments on the smoking volcano in the north of the island. He comments on a strange-looking bird that cannot fly.
He is asked for further comments. He replies that these were the only things that caught or “pulled” his attention. This is not good enough. he is sent back to the island with specific instructions to “direct” his attention rather than waiting for it to be “pulled” in some direction. He is asked to look north and to note down all he sees. Then he should look east and note down what he sees. Then south and then west.
He returns with a much fuller description of the island. This is because he had a framework for “directing attention” rather than relying on something to catch or “pull” his attention.
In the same way, someone is sent into the garden to look at all the colors. The dominant colors will “pull” their attention – the yellow in daffodils, the green in grass. Less-obvious colors will be ignored. However, if that same person is sent into the garden with a framework to look for each color in turn – blue, yellow, red, brown – their attention scan will be far more comprehensive.
Attention is a key element in improving perception. If we don’t direct attention, we see only the familiar patterns.
So what can we do about directing attention instead of waiting for our attention to be pulled towards something, usually something unusual? In my book Six Frames for Thinking about Information, I noted that we could set directions in which to look and in each case note what we see in that direction. We look for value, for interest, for accuracy, for satisfaction, etc.
In exactly the same way we can create formal frameworks for “directing attention” which function like the NSEW (North-South-East-West) framework and which improve perception.”

– Edward de Bono; Think! Before It’s Too Late, 2009

Theodore Levitt

“if thinking is an intellectual response to a problem, then the absence of a problem leads to the absence of thinking. If your product has an automatically expanding market, then you will not give so much thought to how to expand it”

– Theodore Levitt; Marketing Myopia, 1960

Theodore Levitt

“Just as energy is the basis of life itself, and ideas the source of innovation, so is innovation the vital spark of all human change, improvement and progress.”

– Theodore Levitt, (1925 – 2006)

Oren Harari

Innovation vs. Continuous Improvement

“The light bulb wasn’t invented by continuously improving the candle…it was about understanding what the job to be done was and then stepping back to look for solutions to solve this.”

– Oren Harari

Elon Musk

“It is important to reason from first principles rather by analogy; the normal way we conduct our life is we reason by analogy, we’re doing this because is like something else that was done or it is like what other people are doing… It is kind of mentally easier to reason by analogy rather than first principles but first principles is kind of a physics way of looking at the world and what it really means is that you boil things down to the most fundamentals truths and ask what are we sure is true or sure is possibly true and then reason up from there that takes a lot more mental energy.”

– Elon Musk; 2014

Clayton M. Christensen

“By analogy, the ancients who attempted to fly by strapping feathered wings to their arms and flapping with all their might as they leapt from high places invariably failed. Despite their dreams and hard work, they were fighting against some very powerful forces of nature. No one could be strong enough to win this fight. Flight became possible only after people came to understand the relevant natural laws and principles that defined how the world worked: the law of gravity, Bernoulli’s principle, and the concepts of lift, drag, and resistance. When people then designed flying systems that recognized or harnessed the power of these laws and principles, rather than fighting them, they were finally able to fly to heights and distances that were previously unimaginable.”

– Clayton M. Christensen, The Innovator’s Dilemma, 2011

Clayton M. Christensen

“Every company in every industry works under certain forces – laws of organizational nature – that act powerfully to define what that company can and cannot do. Managers faced with disruptive technologies fail their companies when these forces overpower them.”

– Clayton M. Christensen, The Innovator’s Dilemma, 2011

Peter Diamandis

Four years ago here at TED, Ray Kurzweil and I started a new university called Singularity University. And we teach our students all of these technologies, and particularly how they can be used to solve humanity’s grand challenges. And every year we ask them to start a company or a product or a servicethat can affect positively the lives of a billion people within a decade. Think about that, the fact that, literally, a group of students can touch the lives of a billion people today. 30 years ago that would have sounded ludicrous. Today we can point at dozens of companies that have done just that.

– Peter Diamandis; TED Talk: Abundance is our future, 2012

Peter Diamandis

When I think about creating abundance, it’s not about creating a life of luxury for everybody on this planet; it’s about creating a life of possibility. It is about taking that which was scarce and making it abundant. You see, scarcity is contextual, and technology is a resource-liberating force.”

– Peter Diamandis; TED Talk: Abundance is our future, 2012

Peter Diamandis

But here, here is the biggest force for bringing about a world of abundance. I call it the rising billion. So the white lines here are population. We just passed the seven billion mark on Earth. And by the way, the biggest protection against a population explosion is making the world educated and healthy. In 2010, we had just short of two billion people online, connected. By 2020, that’s going from two billion to five billionInternet users. Three billion new minds who have never been heard from before are connecting to the global conversation. What will these people want? What will they consume? What will they desire? And rather than having economic shutdown, we’re about to have the biggest economic injection ever. These people represent tens of trillions of dollars injected into the global economy. And they will get healthier by using the Tricorder, and they’ll become better educated by using the Khan Academy, and by literally being able to use 3D printing and infinite computing [become] more productive than ever before.

– Peter Diamandis; TED Talk: Abundance is our future, 2012

Peter Diamandis

The one thing I’ve learned at the X Prize is that small teams driven by their passion with a clear focus can do extraordinary things, things that large corporations and governments could only do in the past.

– Peter Diamandis; TED Talk: Abundance is our future, 2012

Peter Diamandis

The 6 Ds Progression or the growth cycle of digital technologies (Six Ds of Exponentials);

1. Digitization: Turning every product or service into “1’s and 0’s.”
2. Deception: The doubling of small numbers is deceptive. Start doubling 0.1 to 0.2… 0.4… 0.8… and at this phase, it all looks like “zero”
3. Disruption: After we reach “1,” just 30 doublings later, we’re at 1 billion
4. Dematerialization: Exponential technology turns tangible “things” into digital apps. I no longer carry around GPS equipment — it’s an app on my phone
5. Demonetization: The cost of duplicating and sending an app is essentially zero
6. Democratization: Once products and services are digital, they go global and can become ubiquitous

– Peter Diamandis & Steven Kotler; Bold, 2015

Peter Diamandis

Peter’s Laws

Law 1: If anything can go wrong, Fix it! to hell with Murphy!
Law 2: When given a choice, take both!
Law 3: Multiple projects lead to multiple successes
Law 4: Start at the top, then work your way up
Law 5: Do it by the book… but be the author!
Law 6: When forced to compromise, ask for more
Law 7: If you can’t win, change the rules
Law 8: If you can’t change the rules, then ignore them
Law 9: Perfection is not optional
Law 10: When faced without a challenge, make one
Law 11: “No” simply means begin again at one level higher
Law 12: Don’t walk when you can run
Law 13: When in doubt: THINK!
Law 14: Patience is a virtue, but persistence to the point of success is blessing
Law 15: The squeaky wheel gets replaced
Law 16: The faster you move, the slower time passes, the longer you live
Law 17: The best way to predict the future is to create it yourself!
Law 18: The ratio of something to nothing is infinite
Law 19: You get what you incentivize
Law 20: if you think it is impossible, then it is… for you
Law 21: An expert is someone who can tell you exactly how it can’t be done
Law 22: The day before something is a breakthrough it’s a crazy idea
Law 23: If it were easy it would have been done already
Law 24: Without a target you’ll miss it every time
Law 25: Fail early, fail often, fail forward!
Law 26: If you can`t measure it, you can’t improve it
Law 27: The world’s most precious resource is the persistent and passionate and human mind
Law 28: Bureaucracy is an obstacle to be conquered with persistence
Law 29: Find something you would die for and live for it

– Peter Diamandis; Peter’s Laws The Creed of the Persistent and Passionate Mind, 2015

Ray Kurzweil

“This brilliant must-read book provides the key to the coming era of abundance replacing eons of scarcity. Abundance is a powerful antidote to today’s malaise and pessimism.”

– Ray Kurzweil, 2012

Ray Kurzweil

“We won’t experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century— it will be more like 20,000 years of progress (at today’s rate).”

– Ray Kurzweil, March 7, 2001

Michio Kaku

“The economy will shift from commodity capitalism to intellectual capitalism. Products of the mind cannot be massed produced…
The United Kingdom now derives more revenue from rock and roll than it does from its coal mining operations.”

– Michio Kaku, 2013

Michio Kaku

“Science is the engine of prosperity.”

– Michio Kaku

Michio Kaku

“Science and technology are a double-edge sword.”

– Michio Kaku

Isaac Newton

“Plato is my friend – Aristotle is my friend – but my greatest friend is truth.”

– Isaac Newton, (1643 – 1727)

Avinash Kaushik

“I believe that most websites such because HiPPOs, create them. HiPPO is an acronym for the “Highest Paid Person’s Opinion.
By leveraging the power of Experimentation and Testing tools such as the free Google Website Optimizer or commercial tools such as Omniture’s Test& Target, Autonomy’s Optimost, or SiteSpect, you can change your strategy. Rather than launching a site with one idea (the HiPPo’s idea, of course), you can run experiments live on your site with various ideas and let your customers tell you what works best. So sweet, I call it the “revenge of the customers!”.”

– Avinash Kaushik; Web Analytics 2.0, 2009

Avinash Kaushik

“Data stories are considered to be boring, for a very good reason: They are. The primary reason is that the analysis/insight is considered to be the end-goal, when in reality it is simply a means to an end. The end of course being massive business impact actioned by data insights..”
The secondary reason is that our presentations tend to crave complexity, make easy things hard to understand, and ignore common-sense principles when it comes to data presentation.”

– Avinash Kaushik, 2016

Cynthia A. Montgomery

“Los términos propósito y ventaja competitiva pueden utilizarse juntos, pero la ventaja competitiva se concentra en la competencia de la firma. Eso es importante, pero no es suficiente. En demasiadas ocasiones, los líderes piensan que la esencia de la estrategia es vencer a la competencia. No es así. La estrategia tiene que ver con satisfacer una necesidad no cubierta, haciendo algo único o haciéndolo especialmente bien. Por supuesto, es crucial vencer a la competencia, pero eso es resultado de hacer encontrado y satisfecho esa necesidad, no la meta.”

– Cynthia A. Montgomery; El Estratega, 2012

Cynthia A. Montgomery

“Muchas personas piensan en la estrategia como si se tratara de un juego de suma de cero entre la firma y sus competidores, proveedores y clientes: ¿Cómo ganar? ¿Cómo obtener lo que es mejor para nosotros? Al hacerlo, se concentran principalmente en la esfera que resulta la más cercana: aumentar ganancias, por medio de mayores precios o menores costos. En la gráfica del Valor Agregado, tenemos la zona denominada “Valor capturado por la firma.”

Un trío de economistas estudiosos de la teoría del juego, sugirieron un ángulo más amplio. Nos recuerdan que los gerentes necesitan pensar no sólo en lo que es mejor para sus empresas, sino también en cómo lo que hacen afecta a otros. Esto abarca las dos líneas exteriores de la gráfica: el deseo de pagar de los clientes (esencialmente la satisfacción del cliente con un bien o servicio) y el de los suministradores de proveer esencialmente su costo de oportunidad – el costo más bajo al que están dispuestos a vender a una firma particular). Cuando una empresa aumenta el margen entre estos rubros – incrementando el valor total creado – su existencia importa en una industria. Cuando lo hace, es mucho más probable que sea capaz de reclamar algo del valor para sí – por ejemplo, aumentando su propia rentabilidad – sin hacer que sus socios tengan menores utilidades.

Wal-Mart es un ejemplo clásico. Ofrece a sus clientes productos de buena calidad a precios más bajos, incrementando la percepción de valor que tienen los clientes. De manera simultánea, baja sus propios costos al reducir los de sus proveedores. Lo logra comprando en gran escala, compartiendo información y reduciendo costos en sus sistemas.
Existen interesantes paralelos entre Sam Walton e Ingvar Kamprad: por ejemplo, ambos enriquecieron su visión de venta al menudeo con bajos precios, logrando atraer a clientes que no tenían mucho dinero. No obstante, el paralelo más importante desde el punto de vista estratégico, es que ambos comprendieron los beneficios de añadir valor por medio de la existencia de la empresa y no sólo luchando para ver quién se quedaba con la rebanada más grande del pastel.”

– Cynthia A. Montgomery; El Estratega, 2012

Michael Porter

“The essence of strategy is choosing what not to do.”

– Michael Porter, (1947 – Present)

Michael Porter

“The essence of strategy is that you must set limits on what you’re trying to accomplish.”

– Michael Porter, (1947 – Present)

Michael Porter

“Strategy is about making choices, trade-offs; it’s about deliberately choosing to be different.”

– Michael Porter, (1947 – Present)

Michael Porter

“The best CEOs I know are teachers, and at the core of what they teach is strategy.”

– Michael Porter, (1947 – Present)

Michael Porter

“The company without a strategy is willing to try anything.”

– Michael Porter, (1947 – Present)

Michael Porter

“There is a fundamental distinction between strategy and operational effectiveness.”

– Michael Porter, (1947 – Present)

Michael Porter

Strategy is holistic, it implies putting all the pieces together to achieve a unique competitive position. Strategy is the whole but not the parts. Strategy is the interconnection and reinforcement of all the choices of a company; integration is everything.You have to know who the target customers are, the unique value proposition you are offering them, how are you creating, producing, selling, delivering value.It’s important to choose and select one place to compete where you can deliver the best value. Trade-offs are really important, they create the need for choice; trade-offs make a strategy sustainable against imitation by established rivals. Every strategy involves a choice where you want to create value. The essence of strategy is making choices. Strategy is not vague, is very concrete: who are your customers, how are you gonna deliver value to that customers in concrete terms and how you are going to leverage your operations to deliver that uniqueness. Strategy implies a mutual reinforcement between different parts. A great strategy is hard to copy. A good strategy makes a set of customer incredibly happy, but a great strategy can’t make all of the customers happy.”

– Michael Porter, (1947 – Present)

Theodore Levitt

“The purpose of a business is to get and keep a customer. Without customers, no amount of engineering wizardry, clever financing, or operations expertise can keep a company going.”

– Theodore Levitt, (1925 – 2006)

Theodore Levitt

“The true purpose of a business is to create and keep a customer, not to make you money.”

– Theodore Levitt, (1925 – 2006)

Theodore Levitt

“All organizations are hierarchical. At each level people serve under those above them. An organization is therefore a structure institution. If it is not structured, it is a mob. Mobs do not get things done, they destroy things.”

– Theodore Levitt, (1925 – 2006)

Theodore Levitt

“An industry begins with the customer and his or her needs, not with a patent, a raw material, or a selling skill.”

– Theodore Levitt, (1925 – 2006)

Theodore Levitt

“Organizations exist to enable ordinary people to do extraordinary things.”

– Theodore Levitt, (1925 – 2006)

Theodore Levitt

“Every major industry was once a growth industry. But some that are now riding a wave of growth enthusiasm are very much in the shadow of decline. Others that are thought of as seasoned growth industries have actually stopped growing. In every case, the reason growth is threatened, slowed, or stopped is not because the market is saturated. It is because there has been a failure of management.”

– Theodore Levitt, (1925 – 2006)

Theodore Levitt

“Selling concerns itself with the tricks and techniques of getting people to exchange their cash for your product. It is not concerned with the values that the exchange is all about. And it does not, as marketing invariable does, view the entire business process as consisting of a tightly integrated effort to discover, create, arouse and satisfy customer needs.”

– Theodore Levitt, (1925 – 2006)

Theodore Levitt

“A product is not a product unless it sells. Otherwise it is merely a museum piece.”

– Theodore Levitt, (1925 – 2006)

Theodore Levitt

“What is often lacking is not creativity in the idea-creating sense but innovation in the action-producing sense, i.e. putting ideas to work.”

– Theodore Levitt, (1925 – 2006)

Theodore Levitt

“The trouble with much of the advice business is getting today about the need to be more vigorously creative is, essentially, that its advocates have generally failed to distinguish between the relatively easy process of being creative in the abstract and the infinitely more difficult process of being innovationist in the concrete.”

– Theodore Levitt, (1925 – 2006)

John D. Sterman

“Do not bite off more than you can chew.”

– PhD. John Sterman, MIT System Dynamics, 2014

Peter Drucker

“Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.”

– Peter Drucker, (1909 – 2005)

Peter Drucker

“The best way to predict the future is to create it.”

– Peter Drucker, (1909 – 2005)

Peter Drucker

“Knowledge has to be improved, challenged, and increased constantly, or it vanishes.”

– Peter Drucker, (1909 – 2005)

Peter Drucker

“The purpose of a business is to create a customer.”

– Peter Drucker, (1909 – 2005)

Peter Drucker

“The entrepreneur always searches for change, responds to it, and exploits it as an opportunity.”

– Peter Drucker, (1909 – 2005)

Peter Drucker

“Rank does not confer privilege or give power. It imposes responsibility.”

– Peter Drucker, (1909 – 2005)

Peter Drucker

“No institution can possibly survive if it needs geniuses or supermen to manage it. It must be organized in such a way as to be able to get along under a leadership composed of average human beings.”

– Peter Drucker, (1909 – 2005)

Peter Drucker

“The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well the product or service fits him and sells itself.”

– Peter Drucker, (1909 – 2005)

Abraham Maslow

“If you only have a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.”

– Abraham Maslow, (1908 – 1970)

Archimedes

“Give me a place to stand, and I shall move the earth.”

– Archimedes of Syracusa (287 B.C. – 212 B.C.)

Nikola Tesla

“The spread of civilization may be likened to a fire; first, a feeble spark, next a flickering flame, then a mighty blaze, ever increasing in speed and power.”

– Nikola Tesla, (1856 – 1943)

Nikola Tesla

“Every living being is an engine geared to the wheelwork of the universe. Though seemingly affected only by its immediate surrounding, the sphere of external influence extends to infinite distance.”

– Nikola Tesla, (1856 – 1943)

Nikola Tesla

“Archimedes was my ideal. I admired the works of artists, but to my mind, they were only shadows and semblances. The inventor, I thought, gives to the world creations which are palpable, which live and work.”

– Nikola Tesla, (1856 – 1943)

Isaac Newton

“Geometry does not teach us to draw these lines, but requires them to be drawn; for it requires that the learner should first be taught to describe these accurately, before he enters upon geometry; then it shows how by these operations problems may be solved.”

– Isaac Newton, (1643 – 1727)

Isaac Newton

“If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of Giants.”

– Isaac Newton, (1643 – 1727)

Johann Peter Eckermann

“A French diplomatic personage, contemplating Goethe’s physiognomy, is said to have observed: Voila un homme qui a eu beaucoup de chagrins. A true version of the matter, Goethe himself seems to think, would have been: Here is a man who has struggled toughly; who has/es sich recht sauer werden lassen. Goethe’s life, whether as a writer and thinker, or as a living active man, has indeed been a life of effort, of earnest toilsome endeavor after all excellence”

– Johan Peter Eckermann, Conversations with Goethe, 1836

Goethe

“He who cannot draw on three thousand years is living from hand to mouth.”

– Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749 – 1832)

Goethe

“El que no sabe llevar su contabilidad por espacio de tres mil años se queda como un ignorante en la oscuridad y sólo vive al día.”

– Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749 – 1832)

Leonardo da Vinci

III. Qué regla se deba dar a los principiantes.

“Es evidente que la vista es la operación más veloz de todas cuantas hay, pues solo en un punto percibe infinitas formas; pero en la comprehension es menester que primero se haga cargo de una cosa, y luego de otra: por ejemplo: el lector verá de una ojeada toda esta plana escrita, y en un instante juzgará que toda ella está llena de varias letras; pero no podrá en el mismo tiempo conocer que letras sean, ni lo que dice; y asi es preciso ir palabra por palabra, y linea por linea enterándose de su contenido. También para subir á lo alto de un edificio, tendrás que hacerlo de escalon en escalon, pues de otro modo será imposible conseguirlo. De la misma manera, pues, es preciso caminar en el arte de la Pintura. Si quieres tener una noticia exacta de las formas de todas las cosas, empezarás por cada una de las partes de que se componen, sin pasar a la segunda, hasta tener con firmeza en la memoria y en la práctica la primera. De otro modo, o se perderá inutilmente el tiempo, o se prolongará el estudio: y ante todas cosas es de advertir, que primero se ha de aprender la diligencia que la prontitud.”

– Leonardo da Vinci; El Tratado de la Pintura, 1651

Leonardo da Vinci

VII. Del modo de estudiar

“Estudiese primero la ciencia, y luego la práctica que se deduce de ella. El Pintor debe estudiar con regla, sin dejar cosa alguna que no encomiende a la memoria, viendo que diferencia hay entre los miembros de un animal, y sus articulaciones o coyunturas.”

– Leonardo da Vinci; El Tratado de la Pintura, 1651

Leonardo da Vinci

XXIII. De aquellos que usan solo la práctica sin exactitud y sin ciencia.

“Aquellos que se enamoran de sola la práctica, sin cuidar de la exactitud, o por mejore decir, de la ciencia, son como el Piloto que se embarca sin timon ni aguja; y así nunca sabrá á dónde vá a parar. La práctica debe cimentarse sobre una buena teórica, a la cual sirve de guía la Perspectiva; y en no entrando por esta puerta, nunca se podrá hacer cosa perfecta ni en la Pintura, ni en alguna otra profesión.”

– Leonardo da Vinci; El Tratado de la Pintura, 1651

Federico García Lorca

“Tenía frio y no pedía fuego, tenía terrible sed y no pedía agua: pedía libros, es decir, horizontes, es decir, escaleras para subir la cumbre del espíritu y del corazón. Porque la agonía física, biológica, natural, de un cuerpo por hambre, sed o frío, dura poco, muy poco, pero la agonía del alma insatisfecha dura toda la vida.”

– Federico García Lorca, (1898 – 1936)

Goethe

“Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do.”

– Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749 – 1832)

Goethe

“Whatever you can do or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it.”

– Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749 – 1832)

Aristotle

“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit.”

– Aristotle, (385 B.C. – 347 B.C.)

Aristotle

“Amicus Plato, sed magis amica veritas.”

– Aristotle, (385 B.C. – 347 B.C.), Nicomachean Ethics

Plato

“Let no one ignorant of geometry enter.”

– Plato, (428 B.C. – 348 B.C.)

Goethe

“Wer nicht von dreitausend Jahren
Sich weiß Rechenschaft zu geben,
Bleib im Dunkeln unerfahren,
Mag von Tag zu Tage leben.”

– Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe ( 1749 – 1832 )

Muhammad Yunus

“By simply capitalizing on core strengths and knowledge, companies and entrepreneurs can engage in an emerging business model that will enable them to create – and demonstrate – real, sustainable social impact in society.”

– Muhammad Yunus (1940 – Present)

Mahatma Gandhi

“A small body of determined spirits fired by an unquenchable faith in their mission can alter the course of history.”

– Mahatma Gandhi (1869 – 1948)

Mahatma Gandhi

“Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.”

– Mahatma Gandhi (1869 – 1948)

Mahatma Gandhi

“You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty.”

– Mahatma Gandhi (1869 – 1948)